Not a word of truth. Where and why did independent journalism disappear in the Crimea

Ukraine, Crimea, Simferopol, February 27, 2014: Local residents listen to a speech outside the regional parliament. © Pierre Crom

After Russia occupied Crimea in 2014, not only was the Ukrainian government ousted from the peninsula, but also freedom of speech, followed by professional journalism.

Ukraine, Crimea, Sevastopol, March 7, 2014: Russian soldiers without insignia stand guard outside a Ukrainian military base. © Pierre Crom
Ukraine, Chernihivka, May 2021: A dried out lake near Crimea. © Pierre Crom

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Subjectio.org examines influences exercised by the West and Russia in Southeast and Eastern Europe.

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Subjectio

Subjectio

Subjectio.org examines influences exercised by the West and Russia in Southeast and Eastern Europe.

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